Wireless Attacks

It's not news that networks in general are constantly bombarded with attacks. Some of these attacks are unique to wireless networks, as is the case with management frame spoofing. With management frame spoofing, a rogue AP advertises an SSID known to the

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Figure 17-1 Client MFP in Action

Key Topic

Figure 17-1 Client MFP in Action

Figure 17-2 Configuring MFP

Key Topic

Figure 17-2 Configuring MFP

client in an attempt to get the client to connect to the rogue AP. Other attacks apply to both wired and wireless networks:

■ Reconnaissance attacks: An attacker attempts to gain information about your network. Initially, the method of mitigating recon attacks involved hiding the SSID by not broadcasting it in beacon frames.

■ Access attacks: An attacker tries to gain access to data, devices, and/or the network. Initially the method of preventing access to the network involved MAC-based authentication as well as static Wired Equivalent Privacy (WEP). The problem with WEP today is that the keys can be broken in 4 to 7 minutes.

■ Denial-of-service (DoS) attacks: An attacker attempts to keep legitimate users from gaining services they require. Today, the use of intrusion detection system/intrusion prevention system (IDS/IPS) sensors on the wired network can help mitigate these attacks. You also can use MFP to prevent containment DoS attacks.

The mitigation methods used to prevent attacks mentioned here are not very advanced and are considered weak by today's standards. However, you might be wondering how these methods work. What alternatives are there if these mitigation methods are weak? What other options exist? The following sections discuss these aspects.

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