Role in Radio Network

Bridge Application: School District

Richardson Elementary Yagi

Bode

Elementary Yagi

Bode

Elementary Yagi

Channel #1 Channel #6

High School 2 Bridges

One 12 dBi omni One Dish

□□□□□ □□□□□ □□□□□ □□□□□ □□□□□

Channel #1 Channel #6

Channel #11

Price Elementary Yagi

Roberts Middle School Dish

Weaver-Special Education Dish

High School 2 Bridges

One 12 dBi omni One Dish

Administratio 2 Bridges One 12 dBi omrî One Yagi

Cisco.corri

Price Elementary Yagi

Roberts Middle School Dish

Weaver-Special Education Dish

Cisco.corri

Lincoln

Elementary

Yagi

Dewitt Elementary Yagi

Middle School Yagi

Lincoln

Elementary

Yagi

Dewitt Elementary Yagi

Middle School Yagi

Illustrated in the slide above is a typical school environment based on a 2.4 GHz bridging solution; faster speeds may be obtained using a 5 GHz bridging solution. The Internet line comes into the Administration building. At that site, the network spans in two directions.

Assume 5.5 Mbps of throughput for the 11 Mbps bridges. Weaver, Lincoln, Bolich, and Dewitt schools all communicate to the administration building with channel 1, providing a minimum of 1.3 Mbps throughput connection to each school. (That is T1 speed!)

Richardson, Roberts and Bode all communicate to the High School using Channel 11, providing at least 1.8 Mbps throughput to the High School. The data is then passed on to another bridge that uses Channel 6 to communicate to the Administration building. Price school is also tied in on this same channel. In this manner we have 5 schools sharing Channel 6, which still provides over 1.1 Mbps to all 5 schools.

Over all, the worst case for ANY school is over 1 Mbps of throughput. And payback for the cost of the bridges averages about 1 year. No need to spend taxpayer's money year after year.

Cisco Aironet = LESS MONEY & MORE PERFORMANCE

Typical Bridge Scenarios

Root

Non-Root

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