Main Setup

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To change the Ethernet and access point radio parameters from the Main Menu, you can access the menus by clicking on the links, as shown above.

Note Ethernet = Access Point's internal 10/100 Mbps Ethernet card.

Note AP Radio: Internal = Access Point's internal 2.4 GHz radio.

Note AP Radio: Module = Access Point's external 5 GHz CardBus radio module.

The IOS AP's interfaces may be accessed from the "NETWORK INTERFACES" tab on the left menu bar. Statistics and configuration options are available for each of the displayed interfaces. Each interface may be reached either via the left menu bar or the link in the Network Interface summary page.

■ FastEthernet: Access Point's integrated 10/100 Mbps Ethernet port

■ Radio0-802.11b: Access Point's internal 2.4 GHz PCI radio module.

■ Radio1-802.11a: Access Point's external 5 GHz CardBus radio module.

© 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights re

The Identification page contains the basic location and identification information for the access point radio port. The access point Radio Identification page differs slightly from the Ethernet port in that it manages the connection with the wireless network.

■ Primary Port Selection: Two sets of yes/no options allow you to designate this port as the primary port of the access point and select whether this port adopts or assumes the identity of the primary port.

■ Primary Port: Ordinarily, the primary port is the access points Ethernet port which is connected to the wired LAN. The primary port determines the access point's MAC and IP addresses. For this page, which identifies the access point radio port and not the Ethernet port, the normal setting for this question is "No".

■ Adopt Primary Port Identity: Indicates whether this port adopts the settings of the primary port (MAC and IP addresses). For this page, which identifies the access point radio port, the normal setting is "Yes." Advanced bridge configurations sometimes require a setting of 'NO'.

■ Port Identification: This section is common to all Identification pages. It displays both default and current identification for MAC Address, IP Address and IP Subnet Mask. Changing a default address on the access point can have very serious consequences including the chance of losing network connectivity or forcing a re-boot of the system. Note: Since the access point radio port normally adopts the Ethernet port settings, "Default" values here are generally ignored and "current" settings come from the Ethernet port.

© 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights re

The FastEthernet Network Interface page permits the simple configuration of the access point Ethernet port.

■ Enable Ethernet: Enable or disable Ethernet port

■ Current Status (Hardware/Software): Enabled/disabled hardware status and Up/down software status

■ Requested Duplex: Either "Auto" configured for negotiation with terminating hub/switch or "Half duplex"/ "Full duplex"

■ Requested Speed: Either "Auto" configured for negotiation with terminating hub/switch or "10 Mbps"/ "100 Mbps"

© 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights re

© 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights re

The Identification page contains the basic location and identification information for the access point 2.4 GHz internal radio port. The access point Radio Identification page differs slightly from the Ethernet port in that it manages the connection with the wireless network.

■ Primary Port Selection: Two sets of yes/no options allow you to designate this port as the primary port of the access point and select whether this port adopts or assumes the identity of the primary port.

■ Primary Port: Ordinarily, the primary port is the access point's Ethernet port which is connected to the wired LAN. The primary port determines the access point's MAC and IP addresses. For this page, which identifies the access point radio port and not the Ethernet port, the normal setting for this question is "No".

■ Adopt Primary Port Identity: Indicates whether this port adopts the settings of the primary port (MAC and IP addresses). For this page which identifies the access point radio port, the normal setting is "Yes." Advanced bridge configurations sometimes require a setting of "NO".

■ Port Identification: This section is common to all Identification pages. It displays both default and current identification for MAC Address, IP Address and IP Subnet Mask. Changing a default address on the access point can have very serious consequences including the chance of losing network connectivity or forcing a re-boot of the system.

Note Since the access point radio port normally adopts the Ethernet port settings, "Default" values here are generally ignored and "current" settings come from the Ethernet port.

© 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights re

The Network Interface menu for the Radio0-802.11B permits the configuration of specific parameters for the 2.4 GHz radio interface.

■ Enable Radio: Radio interface may be Enabled or Disabled from the radio buttons.

■ Current Status: Indicates Software/Hardware status- software status either enabled or disabled, hardware status up or down.

■ Role in Radio Network: AP may be set as a Root AP or Repeater AP. The "fallback" mechanism for Lost Ethernet may also be modified here.

■ Data Rates: The data rates supported for this interface may be controlled via this menu. The setting for "Require" configures the data rate at which broadcast 802.11 packets are sent at. "Enable" configures the supported unicast 802.11 packet rates supported. "Disable" turns off the packets transmit at this data rate.

■ Transmitter Power: The transmit power setting of the AP may be controlled via this parameter.

■ Limit Client Power: Information may be sent in beacons to control the maximum transmit power for client devices.

© 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights re

© 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights re

The Identification page contains the basic location and identification information for the access point 5 GHz module radio port. The access point Radio Identification page differs slightly from the Ethernet port in that it manages the connection with the wireless network.

■ Primary Port Selection: Two sets of yes/no options allow you to designate this port as the primary port of the access point and select whether this port adopts or assumes the identity of the primary port.

■ Primary Port: Ordinarily, the primary port is the access point's Ethernet port which is connected to the wired LAN. The primary port determines the access point's MAC and IP addresses. For this page, which identifies the access point radio port and not the Ethernet port, the normal setting for this question is "No".

■ Adopt Primary Port Identity: Indicates whether this port adopts the settings of the primary port (MAC and IP addresses). For this page which identifies the access point radio port, the normal setting is "Yes." Advanced bridge configurations sometimes require a setting of "NO".

■ Port Identification: This section is common to all Identification pages. It displays both default and current identification for MAC Address, IP Address and IP Subnet Mask. Changing a default address on the access point can have very serious consequences including the chance of losing network connectivity or forcing a re-boot of the system.

Note Since the access point radio port normally adopts the Ethernet port settings, "Default" values here are generally ignored and "current" settings come from the Ethernet port.

© 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights re

The Network Interface menu for the Radio0-802.11A permits the configuration of specific parameters for the 5 GHz radio interface.

■ Enable Radio: Radio interface may be Enabled or Disabled from the radio buttons.

■ Current Status: Indicates Software/Hardware status- software status either enabled or disabled, hardware status up or down.

■ Role in Radio Network: AP may be set as a Root AP or Repeater AP. The "fallback" mechanism for Lost Ethernet may also be modified here.

■ Data Rates: The data rates supported for this interface may be controlled via this menu. The setting for "Require" configures the data rate at which broadcast 802.11 packets are sent at. "Enable" configures the supported unicast 802.11 packet rates supported. "Disable" turns off the packets transmit at this data rate.

■ Transmitter Power: The transmit power setting of the AP may be controlled via this parameter.

■ Limit Client Power: Information may be sent in beacons to control the maximum transmit power for client devices.

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■ Speed: The Speed drop-down menu lists five options for the type of connector, connection speed, and duplex setting used by the port. The option you select must match the actual connector type, speed, and duplex settings used to link the port with the wired network.

■ Auto: This is the default and the recommended setting. The connection speed and duplex setting are automatically negotiated between the access point and the hub, switch, or router to which the access point is connected.

Note Some switches with inline power do not fully support Ethernet speed auto-negotiation. If your access point is powered by a switch with inline power, the Auto speed setting is applied only after you reboot the access point.

■ 10-Base-T / Half Duplex—Ethernet network connector for 10-Mbps transmission speed over twisted-pair wire and operating in half-duplex mode.

■ 10-Base-T / Full Duplex—Ethernet network connector for 10-Mbps transmission speed over twisted-pair wire and operating in full-duplex mode.

■ 100-Base-T / Half Duplex—Ethernet network connector for 100-Mbps transmission speed over twisted-pair wire and operating in half-duplex mode.

■ 100-Base-T / Full Duplex—Ethernet network connector for 100-Mbps transmission speed over twisted-pair wire and operating in full-duplex mode.

© 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights re

■ Loss of Backbone Connectivity # of Sees (1-10000): This setting specifies the amount of time the access point has before taking action when it detects a loss of backbone connectivity (such as a loss of Ethernet link and no active trunks available on its radio). The action the access point takes is specified in the Loss of Backbone Connectivity Action setting, described in the next section.

■ Loss of Backbone Connectivity Action: This setting determines what action the access point takes when a loss of backbone connectivity occurs after the time specified in the previous setting. The following actions can be taken:

— Switch to repeater mode—the access point disassociates all its current clients and becomes a repeater during the period when its backbone connectivity is lost. The access point attempts to communicate with another root access point using the same SSIDs. If it establishes a connection, clients can associate with the root access point through this repeater to maintain connectivity to the backbone LAN. If an appropriate root access point is found, no clients can associate to this access point.

— Shut the radio off—the access point effectively removes itself from the infrastructure by disassociating its current clients and not allowing further associations until backbone connectivity is restored.

— Restrict to SSID—the access point disassociates all its current clients and switches to use the SSID configured in the Loss of Backbone Connectivity: SSID setting. After this action is taken, only a client using the specified SSID can associate with the access point, allowing an administrator to perform failure recovery or diagnostic procedures.

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■ Loss of Backbone Connectivity SSID: This setting specifies the SSID used by the access point if the Loss of Backbone Connectivity Action setting is set as Restrict to SSID and backbone connectivity is lost for longer than the time specified in the Loss of Backbone Connectivity: Number of Seconds setting. The setting also defines an administrator-only SSID an administrator uses to communicate with the access point for diagnostic and failure-recovery purposes. If VLANs are active on the access point, the VLAN names are displayed in the Loss of Backbone Connectivity SSID field.

© 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights re

The FastEthernet Network Interface page permits the simple configuration of the access point Ethernet port.

■ Enable Ethernet: Enable or disable Ethernet port

■ Current Status (Hardware/Software): Enabled/disabled hardware status and Up/down software status

■ Requested Duplex: Either "Auto" configured for negotiation with terminating hub/switch or "Half duplex"/ "Full duplex"

■ Requested Speed: Either "Auto" configured for negotiation with terminating hub/switch or "10 Mbps"/ "100 Mbps"

■ Service Set ID (SSID): An identifier that stations must use to be able to communicate with an access point. Cisco recommends assigning or changing the SSID on the Express Setup page [Summary Status > Setup > Express Setup]. You can enter non-ASCII characters in the SSID by typing a backslash ( \ ), a lower-case x, and the characters to represent the nonASCII character. For example, \xbd inserts the symbol A. Click more to go to the AP Internal Radio Service Sets page where you can create additional SSIDs. From this page you can also edit an existing SSID or remove one from the system.

■ Allow "Broadcast" SSID to Associate?: Allows you to choose whether devices that do not specify an SSID (devices that are "broadcasting" in search of an access point to associate with) are allowed to associate with the access point.

— Yes: The default setting allows devices that do not specify an SSID (devices that are "broadcasting" in search of an access point to associate with) to associate with the access point.

— No: Devices that do not specify an SSID (devices that are "broadcasting" in search of an access point to associate with) are not allowed to associate with the access point. The SSID used by the client device must match that of the access point.

■ Enable World Mode: When you select yes from the world-mode pull-down menu, the access point adds channel carrier set information to its beacon. Client devices with world-mode enabled receive the carrier set information and adjust their settings automatically.

■ Data Rates: You use the data rate settings to choose the data rates the access point uses for data transmission. The rates are expressed in megabits per second. The access point always attempts to transmit at the highest rate selected. If there are obstacles or interference, the access point steps down to the highest rate that allows data transmission. For each of four rates (1, 2, 5.5, and 11 megabits per second), a drop-down menu lists three options:

— Basic (default)—Allows transmission at this rate for all packets, both unicast and multicast. At least one data rate must be set to Basic.

— Yes—Allows transmission at this rate for unicast packets only.

— No—Does not allow transmission at this rate.

■ The Optimize Radio Network For setting on the Express Setup page selects the data rate settings automatically. When you select Optimize Radio Network For Throughput on the Express Setup page, all four data rates are set to basic. When you select Optimize Radio Network For Range on the Express Setup page, the 1.0 data rate is set to basic, and the other data rates are set to Yes.

■ Transmit Power: This setting determines the power level of radio transmission. To reduce interference or to conserve power, select a lower power setting. The settings in the dropdown menu on 2.4 GHz radios include 1, 5, 20, 50, and 100 milliwatts (mW). Some countries limit the maximum power setting to 50 mW.

■ Default Radio Channel: specifies which channel the access point will use for operation.

■ Search for less-congested Radio Channel?: Upon applying this setting, or when the access point is restarted, the access point will listen for beacons from other access points and automatically choose the best channel (the channel that will cause least interference with other access points).

■ Restrict Searched Channels: This screen allows you to limit the channels the Access Point scans when Search for less-congested radio channel is enabled. All the channels in the Access Point's regulatory domain are listed. Click the Search check boxes beside the channels to include or exclude channels in the scan for less-congested channels. All the channels are included in the search by default.

■ Receive Antenna / Transmit Antenna:

— Diversity-This default setting tells the device to use the antenna that receives the best signal. If your device has two fixed (non-removable) antennas, you should use this setting for both receive and transmit.

— Right / Primary-If your device has removable antennas and you install a high-gain antenna on the primary connector, you should use this setting for both receive and transmit. When you look at the top panel, the primary antenna is on the right.

— Left / Secondary-If your device has removable antennas and you install a high-gain antenna on the secondary connector, you should use this setting for both receive and transmit. When you look at the top panel, the secondary antenna is on the left.

© 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights re

The Network Interface menu for the Radio0-802.11B permits the configuration of specific parameters for the 2.4 GHz radio interface.

■ Role in Radio Network: AP may be set as a Root AP or Repeater AP. The "fallback" mechanism for Lost Ethernet may also be modified here. AP may be configured for one of the following fallback modes:

■ Fallback to Radio Island- radio is still activated, clients maintain association, but have not wired network connection

■ Fallback to Radio Shutdown- radio disabled upon loss of Ethernet

■ Fallback to Repeater- radio switches to repeater mode upon loss of Ethernet

■ Repeater Non-root- radio operates in repeater mode- Ethernet disabled

■ Data Rates: The setting for "Require" configures the data rate at which broadcast 802.11 packets are sent at. "Enable" configures the supported unicast 802.11 packet rates supported. "Disable" turns off the packets transmit at this data rate. The setting for "Best Range" configures broadcast ONLY for 1 Mbps. The setting for "Best Throughput" configures broadcast for all data rates. This permits clients to transmit all packets at their highest possible rate.

Middle Portion of screen

Middle Portion of screen

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Also on Network Interface screen:

■ Default Radio Channel: Permits the configuration of an explicit frequency for the AP to utilize or permits the AP to select the "Least Congested Channel" based upon 802.11 activity.

■ Least Congested Channel Search: Permits the configuration of explicit frequencies for the AP to search when determining frequency to use.

■ World Mode Multi-Domain Operation: When this feature is enabled, the AP will transmit information in the 802.11 beacons which informs the client devices which frequencies and power are allowable for the AP's configured regulatory domain.

■ Radio Preamble: Configure either Long or Short, depending on network device capabilities.

■ Receive Antenna: Configure either Right/Left/Diversity antennas, depending on requirements and per any special installation

■ Transmit Antenna: Configure either Right/Left/Diversity antennas, depending on requirements and per any special installation

■ Aironet Extensions: Enabled or Disabled- enable to allow roaming and Cisco-specific security options

■ Ethernet Encapsulation Transform: Specify either RFC1042 or 802.1H- 802.1H permits optimal performance with Cisco equipment/ RFC1042 permits optimal interoperability

Lower Portion of Screen

Lower Portion of Screen

© 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. AWLF v3.1—8-36

■ Reliable Multicast to WGB: If enabled, this parameter requires the acknowledgement of all packets transmit to WGB. Depending on network, this may result in lower aggregate throughput

■ Publicly Secure Packet Forwarding: If enabled, this parameter prevents communication between clients on a single AP

■ Beacon Period: This parameter controls the rate at which beacons are transmitted from the AP to the client devices (in milliseconds).

■ Data Beacon Rate (DTIM): Rate at which Traffic Indicator Map information is sent to clients- indicating buffered data for client

■ Max. Data Retries: Maximum allowable retries for 802.11 packets

■ RTS Max. Retries: Maximum allowable retries for messages which are rejected due to packets beyond RTS threshold

■ Fragmentation Threshold: Maximum allowable size packet prior to fragmenting packet

■ RTS Threshold: Packet size (and larger) for which RTS messaging is used

■ Repeater Parent AP Timeout: The parameter allows the configuration of a timeout parameter for which the repeater AP will pause before seeking the "next" AP in it's list of valid parent AP's.

■ Repeater Parent AP MAC X: This parameter allows the assignment and prioritization of "Parent" AP's for the configured AP to associate to.

■ Service Set ID (SSID): An identifier that stations must use to be able to communicate with an access point. Cisco recommends assigning or changing the SSID on the Express Setup page [Summary Status > Setup > Express Setup]. You can enter non-ASCII characters in the SSID by typing a backslash ( \ ), a lower-case x, and the characters to represent the nonASCII character. For example, \xbd inserts the symbol A. Click more to go to the AP Internal Radio Service Sets page where you can create additional SSIDs. From this page you can also edit an existing SSID or remove one from the system.

■ Allow "Broadcast" SSID to Associate?: Allows you to choose whether devices that do not specify an SSID (devices that are "broadcasting" in search of an access point to associate with) are allowed to associate with the access point.

— Yes: The default setting allows devices that do not specify an SSID (devices that are "broadcasting" in search of an access point to associate with) to associate with the access point.

— No: Devices that do not specify an SSID (devices that are "broadcasting" in search of an access point to associate with) are not allowed to associate with the access point. The SSID used by the client device must match that of the access point.

■ Enable World Mode: When you select yes from the world-mode pull-down menu, the access point adds channel carrier set information to its beacon. Client devices with world-mode enabled receive the carrier set information and adjust their settings automatically. Currently world-mode is not supported on 5 GHz.

■ Data Rates: You use the data rate settings to choose the data rates the access point uses for data transmission. The rates are expressed in megabits per second. The access point always attempts to transmit at the highest rate selected. If there are obstacles or interference, the access point steps down to the highest rate that allows data transmission. For each of eight rates (6,9,12,18,24,36,48, and 54 megabits per second), a drop-down menu lists three options:

— Basic (default)—Allows transmission at this rate for all packets, both unicast and multicast. At least one data rate must be set to Basic.

— Yes—Allows transmission at this rate for unicast packets only.

— No—Does not allow transmission at this rate.

■ The Optimize Radio Network For setting on the Express Setup page selects the data rate settings automatically. When you select Optimize Radio Network For Throughput on the Express Setup page, all four data rates are set to basic. When you select Optimize Radio Network For Range on the Express Setup page, the 1.0 data rate is set to basic, and the other data rates are set to Yes.

■ Transmit Power: This setting determines the power level of radio transmission. To reduce interference or to conserve power, select a lower power setting. The settings in the dropdown menu on 5 GHz Module 5,10,20, and 40 milliwatts.

© 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights re

■ Default Radio Channel: specifies which channel the access point will use for operation.

■ Search for less-congested Radio Channel?: Upon applying this setting, or when the access point is restarted, the access point will listen for beacons from other access points and automatically choose the best channel (the channel that will cause least interference with other access points).

■ Restrict Searched Channels: This screen allows you to limit the channels the Access Point scans when Search for less-congested radio channel is enabled. All the channels in the Access Point's regulatory domain are listed. Click the Search check boxes beside the channels to include or exclude channels in the scan for less-congested channels. All the channels are included in the search by default.

■ Receive Antenna / Transmit Antenna: The FCC requires 5 GHz access point using UNI-1 and UNII-2 bands to use a fixed antenna. Since external antennas can not be attached to the 5 GHz radio module, both Receive Antenna and Transmit Antenna need to be set to Diversity. The 1200 Series Access Points 5 GHz radio module contains two diversity antennas. 1). 6 dBi diversity patch antenna in the wall mount position. 2). 5 dBi omnidirectional antenna in the ceiling mount position.

The Network Interface menu for the Radio0-802.11A permits the configuration of specific parameters for the 5 GHz radio interface.

■ Role in Radio Network: AP may be set as a Root AP or Repeater AP. The "fallback" mechanism for Lost Ethernet may also be modified here. AP may be configured for one of the following fallback modes:

— Fallback to Radio Island- radio is still activated, clients maintain association, but have not wired network connection

— Fallback to Radio Shutdown- radio disabled upon loss of ethernet

— Fallback to Repeater- radio switches to repeater mode upon loss of ethernet

— Repeater Non-root- radio operates in repeater mode- ethernet disabled

■ Data Rates: The setting for "Require" configures the data rate at which broadcast 802.11 packets are sent at. "Enable" configures the supported unicast 802.11 packet rates supported. "Disable" turns off the packets transmit at this data rate. The setting for "Best Range" configures broadcast ONLY for 6 Mbps. The setting for "Best Throughput" configures broadcast for all data rates. This permits clients to transmit all packets at their highest possible rate. Note that "Default" setting is to broadcast at 6, 12, and 24 Mbps.

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