Enterprise Case Study Acme Corporation

Chapter 2, "Enterprise Telephony Today," discusses ways you can build enterprise telephone networks. This section discusses ways you can use packet voice technologies not only to save money on long-distance charges, but also to decrease capital expenditures on other recurring charges.

To review, Figure 6-12 shows how numerous enterprise networks have a centralized location with multiple remote sites. The connections between the central site and the remote sites are often called tie-lines. Built to transport voice, tie-lines are permanent 64 Kbps connections that can actually transport voice or data.

Figure 6-12. Enterprise Telephony

Figure 6-12. Enterprise Telephony

Most enterprise customers also have data networks, a minor modification and enhancement to the data network can enable voice tie-lines to be replaced simply by moving the voice traffic onto the data infrastructure.

This causes the voice and data infrastructure to look something similar to Figure 6-13.

Figure 6-13. Enterprise Voice and Data Network

Figure 6-13. Enterprise Voice and Data Network

Replacing tie-lines with VoIP and leaving the rest of the infrastructure is just the first step to successful voice and data convergence. Many more steps are necessary.

Acme Corporation, an enterprise customer, wants to converge its voice and data networks to save money in the short term. This book does not provide detailed information on actual monetary savings, but it does highlight some of the areas in which savings can potentially occur.

Having two separate infrastructures for a voice and data network requires that you have leased lines not only for voice, but also for data paths. Figure 6-14 shows a typical enterprise customer with separate networks.

Figure 6-14. Typical Enterprise Voice and Data Network

Figure 6-14. Typical Enterprise Voice and Data Network

The voice network uses multiplexers to connect voice and data networks across one T1 circuit. When voice is not being used, however, the voice network is still consuming bandwidth across the leased T1 circuit.

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