Foundation Summary

The "Foundation Summary" is a collection of tables and figures that provide a convenient review of many key concepts in this chapter. For those of you already comfortable with the topics in this chapter, this summary could help you recall a few details. For those of you who just read this chapter, this review should help solidify some key facts. For any of you doing your final prep before the exam, these tables and figures are a convenient way to review the day before the exam.

ISPs make the business choice of whether to police, and how aggressively to police. The options reduce to the following three basic options:

• Do not police. To support the traffic, build the network to support the traffic as if all customers will send and receive data at the clock rate of the access link. From a sales perspective, close deals by claiming that no policing will be done, but encourage customers who exceed their contracts to pay for more bandwidth.

• Police at the contracted rate. To support these traffic levels, the network only needs to be built to support the collective contracted rates, although the core would be overbuilt to support new customers. From a sales perspective, encourage customers that are beginning to exceed their contracts to upgrade, and give incentives.

• Police somewhere in between the contracted rate and the access-link clock rate. For instance, ISP1 might police PB Tents at 5 Mbps, when the contract reads 2 Mbps. The network can be built to support the collective policed rates. The sales team can encourage customers to buy a larger contracted rate when they consistently exceed the contracted rate, but keep customer satisfaction higher by pointing out their generosity by only policing at rates much higher than the contracted rates.

Figure 5-24 points out two cases of egress blocking, using a Frame Relay network as an example.

Figure 5-24 PB Tents Network, Egress Blocking

All VCs 64 kbps CIR

Figure 5-24 points out two cases of egress blocking, using a Frame Relay network as an example.

All VCs 64 kbps CIR

Table 5-27 summarizes some of the key points about when and where you should consider using policing and shaping.

Table 5-27 Policing and Shaping: When to Use Them, and Where

Table 5-27 summarizes some of the key points about when and where you should consider using policing and shaping.

Table 5-27 Policing and Shaping: When to Use Them, and Where

Topic

Rationale

Why police?

If a neighboring network can send more traffic than the traffic contract specifies, policing can be used to enforce the contract, protecting the network from being overrun with too much traffic.

Where to police?

Typically, policing is performed as packets enter the first device in a network. Egress policing is also supported, although it is less typical.

Why shape?

The first of two reasons for shaping is when the neighboring network is policing. Instead of waiting for the neighboring policer to discard traffic, a shaper can instead delay traffic so that it will not be dropped.

The second reason has to do with the effects of egress blocking. By shaping, egress blocking can be avoided, or minimized, essentially moving the queues from inside the service provider cloud, and back into the enterprise routers. By doing so, the router queuing tools can selectively give better QoS performance to particular types of traffic.

Where to shape?

Shaping is always an egress function. Typically, shaping is performed on packets exiting a router, going into another network. This may be the edge between a router and a multiaccess WAN, or possibly just a link to an ISP.

Traffic shaping implements this basic logic by defining a measurement interval, and a number of bits that can be sent in that interval, so that the overall shaped rate is not exceeded. Table 5-28 lists some related definitions.

Table 5-28 Shaping Terminology

Term

Definition

Tc

Time interval, measured in milliseconds, over which the committed burst (Bc) can be sent. With many shaping tools, Tc = Bc/CIR.

Bc

Committed burst size, measured in bits. This is the amount of traffic that can be sent over the interval Tc. Typically also defined in the traffic contract.

CIR

Committed information rate, in bits per second, defines the rate defined in the traffic contract.

Shaped Rate

The rate, in bits per second, to which a particular configuration wants to shape the traffic. In some cases, the shaped rate is set to the same value as CIR; in others, the shaped rate is set to a larger value, with the hope of sending more traffic through the network.

Be

Excess burst size, in bits. This is the number of bits beyond Bc that can be sent after a period of inactivity.

The formulas IOS uses to calculate Tc when you configure both the shaping rate and the Bc are as follows:

Tc = Bc/Shaped rate Figure 5-25 lists the overall process used by shaping, in terms of Tc, Bc, and Be.

Figure 5-25 Bc and Be, After a Period of Inactivity (Both Buckets Full)

Figure 5-25 Bc and Be, After a Period of Inactivity (Both Buckets Full)

0 125 250 375 500 625 750 875 1000

0 125 250 375 500 625 750 875 1000

In summary, most QoS policies call for shaping on each VC. The number of VCs, and how they are configured, dictates where the shaping tool needs to be enabled. Table 5-29 summarizes the options.

Table 5-29 Options of How to Enable Shaping forper-VC Shaping

Location

Requirements for Shaping per VC

No VCs

Shape on the main interface. Shaping occurs for all traffic on interface.

Physical interface, 1 VC, no subinterfaces

Shaping shapes the individual VC associated with this interface. Shaping is enabled on the physical interface.

Physical interface, 1 VC, 1 subinterface

Shaping shapes the individual VC associated with this interface. Shaping can be enabled on the physical interface, the subinterface, or the VC (DLCI).

Table 5-29 Options of How to Enable Shaping forper-VC Shaping (Continued)

Location

Requirements for Shaping per VC

Multiple VCs on 1 interface, point-to-point subinterfaces only

Shaping can be enabled on the subinterface, or per DLCI. Both methods work identically.

Multiple VCs on 1 interface, some multipoint subinterfaces with > 1 VC per subinterface

Must enable shaping on each DLCI to shape per VC.

Table 5-30 lists the traffic-shaping tools, and the queuing tools supported by each for the shaping queues.

Table 5-30 Options for Queuing in Traffic-Shaping Tools

Table 5-30 lists the traffic-shaping tools, and the queuing tools supported by each for the shaping queues.

Table 5-30 Options for Queuing in Traffic-Shaping Tools

Shaping Tool

Queuing Tools Supported for the Shaping Queue(s)

GTS

WFQ

CB shaping

FIFO, WFQ, CBWFQ, LLQ

DTS

FIFO, WFQ, CBWFQ, LLQ

FRTS

FIFO, WFQ, CBWFQ, LLQ, PQ, CQ,

When a shaper uses a queuing tool, instead of having a single shaping queue, multiple shaping queues exist. If FRTS were configured to use PQ, for example, up to four queues could be created for shaping. Figure 5-26 shows the basic idea, with shaping enabled on the physical interface, FIFO Queuing on the physical interface, and PQ configured for the shaping queue.

Figure 5-26 FIFO Queuing for the Physical Interface, Plus PQ for the Shaping Queue

Shaping Queues for a Single VC

PQ High -Shaping Queue

1

Shaping Queue

PQ Normal -

Shaping Queue

*

Shape to À

PQ Low -

96 kbps

Shaping Queue

Interface

Output Queue

TX Ring

AR 128 kbps

Many QoS designs call for shaping per VC. For the same router, with two 64-kbps CIR VCs (each configured on a separate point-to-point subinterface) shaping queues are created for each subinterface, with the familiar output queues as well. Figure 5-27 depicts the overall idea.

Figure 5-27 Fancy Queuing for the Physical Interface as well as for Two Sets of Shaping Queues

Shaping Queues for Subinterface 1

Figure 5-27 Fancy Queuing for the Physical Interface as well as for Two Sets of Shaping Queues

Shaping Queues for Subinterface 1

AR 128 kbps

64 kbps

Subint #2 Shaping Queue1

Subint #2 Shaping Queue2

64 kbps

One goal of policing when Be is being used is to discard some packets, hoping to avoid the point where all packets are discarded. Figure 5-28 shows the general idea of how policers accomplish that goal, using Da and Dc values.

Figure 5-28 Actual Debt and Compounded Debt with Policing

Point at Which Dc Caused Single

Figure 5-28 Actual Debt and Compounded Debt with Policing

Point at Which Dc Caused Single

Dc Da

Tables 5-31 and 5-32 list the configuration and show commands pertinent to GTS.

Table 5-31 Command Reference for Generic Traffic Shaping

Command

Mode and Function

traffic-shape rate bit-rate [burst-size [excess-burst-size]]

Interface configuration mode; enables GTS for a shaped rate, with optional Bc and Be settings, in bits

traffic-shape group access-list bit-rate [burst-size [excess-burst-size]]

Interface configuration mode; enables GTS for a shaped rate, only for traffic permitted by the referenced ACL, with optional Bc and Be settings, in bits

traffic-shape adaptive bit-rate

Interface configuration mode; enables adaptive shaping, and sets the minimum shaped rate

traffic-shape fecn-adapt

Interface configuration mode; enables the reflection of BECN signals upon receipt of an FECN

Table 5-32 Exec Command Reference for Generic Traffic Shaping

Command

Function

show traffic-shape [interface-type interface-number]

Lists information about the configuration details

show traffic-shape queue [interface-number [dlci dlci-number]]

Lists statistics about the queuing tool used on the shaping queue

show traffic-shape statistics [interfacetype interface-number]

Lists statistics about shaping operation

Tables 5-33 and 5-34 list the configuration and show commands pertinent to CB shaping.

Table 5-33 Command Reference for Class-Based Shaping

Command

Mode and Function

shape [average | peak] mean-rate [[burst-size] [excess-burst-size]]

Policy-map class configuration mode; enables shaping for the class, setting the shaping rate, and optionally Bc and Be. The average option causes shaping as normal; the peak option causes Bc + Be to be sent per Tc.

Shape adaptive min-rate

Policy-map class configuration mode; enables the minimum rate for adaptive shaping. The maximum rate is configured with the shape average or shape peak command.

Shape fecn-adapt

Policy-map class configuration mode; enables reflection of BECN signals upon receipt of an FECN.

service-policy {input | output} policy-map-name

Interface or subinterface configuration mode; enables CB shaping on the interface.

Table 5-33 Command Reference for Class-Based Shaping (Continued)

Command

Mode and Function

class-map class-map-name

Global config; names a class map, where classification options are configured.

Match . . .

class-map subcommand; defines specific classification parameters.

match access-group {access-group | name access-group-name}

class-map subcommand; references either numbered or named ACL.

match source-address mac address

class-map subcommand; references the source MAC address that forwarded the packet to this router, typically the previous-hop router.

match ip precedence ip-precedence-value [ip-precedence-value ip-precedence-value ip-precedence-value]

class-map subcommand; references one or more IP precedence values. A packet with any of the listed values matches.

match mpls experimental number

class-map subcommand; references MPLS Experimental bits.

match cos cos-value [cos-value cos-value cos-value]

class-map subcommand; references one or more class of service (CoS) values. A packet with any of the listed values matches.

match destination-address mac address

class-map subcommand; references the destination MAC address of the device to which the packet will be forwarded next.

match input-interface interface-name

class-map subcommand; matches based on the interface in which the packet was received.

match ip dscp ip-dscp-value [ip-dscp-value ip-dscp-value ip-dscp-value ip-dscp-value ip-dscp-value ip-dscp-value ip-dscp-value]

class-map subcommand; references one or more IP DSCP values. A packet with any of the listed values matches.

match ip rtp starting-port-number portrange

class-map subcommand; references a range of UDP ports, only matching the even numbered ports, which carry voice payload.

match qos-group qos-group-value

class-map subcommand; matches based on QoS group.

match protocol protocol-name

class-map subcommand; matches based on NBAR-defined protocol types.

match protocol citrix [app application-name-string].

class-map subcommand; matches based on NBAR-defined Citrix application types.

match protocol http [url url-string | host hostname-string | mime MIME-type]

class-map subcommand; matches based on NBAR-discovered details inside the host name or URL string.

Table 5-33 Command Reference for Class-Based Shaping (Continued)

Command

Mode and Function

match any

class-map subcommand; matches all packets.

policy-map policy-map-name

Global config; names a policy, which is a set of actions to perform.

class name

policy-map subcommand; identifies which packets on which to perform some action by referring to the classification logic in a class map.

Table 5-34 Exec Command Reference for Class-Based Shaping

Command

Function

show policy-map policy-map-name

Lists configuration information about all MQC-based QoS tools

show policy-map interface-spec [input | output] [class class-name]

Lists statistical information about the behavior of all MQC-based QoS tools

Tables 5-35 and 5-36 list the configuration and show commands pertinent to FRTS.

Table 5-35 Command Reference for Frame Relay Traffic Shaping

Command

Mode and Function

frame-relay traffic-shaping

Interface subcommand; enables FRTS on the interface.

class name

Interface DLCI subcommand; enables a specific FRTS map class for the DLCI.

frame-relay class name

Interface or subinterface command; enables a specific FRTS map class for the interface or subinterface.

map-class frame-relay map-class-name

Global configuration mode; names a map class, and places CLI into map-class configuration mode

frame-relay priority-group list-number

Map-class configuration mode; enables PQ for the shaping queues associated with this map class

frame-relay custom-queue-list list-number

Map-class configuration mode; enables CQ for the shaping queues associated with this map class

frame-relay fair-queue

[congestive_discard_threshold [number_dynamic_conversation_queues [number_reservable_conversation_queues [max buffer size_for_fair queues]]]]

Map-class configuration mode; enables WFQ for the shaping queues associated with this map class

Table 5-35 Command Reference for Frame Relay Traffic Shaping (Continued)

Table 5-36

Table 5-35 Command Reference for Frame Relay Traffic Shaping (Continued)

Command

Mode and Function

service-policy {input | output} policy-map-name

Map-class configuration mode; enables LLQ or CBWFQ on the shaping queues associated with the map class.

frame-relay traffic-rate average [peak]

Map-class configuration mode; sets the shaped rate, and the EIR*. Bc and Be are calculated from these, based on Tc of 125ms.

frame-relay bc {in | out} bits

Map-class configuration mode; sets the Bc value. Alternative configuration option to frame-relay traffic-rate.

frame-relay be {in | out} bits

Map-class configuration mode; sets the Be value. Alternative configuration option to frame-relay traffic-rate.

frame-relay cir {in | out} bps

Map-class configuration mode; sets the CIR value. Alternative configuration option to frame-relay traffic-rate.

frame-relay adaptive-shaping {becn | foresight}

Map-class configuration mode; enables adaptive shaping, specifying either BECN or Foresight for signaling.

frame-relay mincir {in | out} bps

Map-class configuration mode; sets the minimum CIR used for adaptive shaping.

frame-relay tc milliseconds

Map-class configuration mode; for 0 CIR VCs, sets the Tc value.

frame-relay qos-autosense

Interface configuration mode; uses ELMI to automatically discover CIR, Bc, and Be settings for each VC.

* EIR = excess information rate

Exec Command Reference for Frame Relay Traffic Shaping

Command

Function

show frame-relay pvc [interface interface] [dlci]

Shows PVC statistics, including shaping statistics

show traffic-shape [interface-type interface-number]

Shows information about FRTS configuration per VC

show traffic-shape queue [interface-number [dlci dlci-number]]

Shows information about the queuing tool used with the shaping queue

show traffic-shape statistics [interface-type interface-number]

Shows traffic-shaping statistics

Frame Relay fragmentation (FRF) can be used with FRTS. Figure 5-29 outlines the basic idea, with FRTS on two subinterfaces.

Figure 5-29 Interaction Between Shaping Queues and Frame Relay Fragmentation Queues

Shaping Queues for Subinterface 1

Subint #1 Shaping Queue1

Subint #1 Shaping Queue2

Shape to 96 kbps

Dual FIFO Interface Queues

Shaping Queues for Subinterface 2

Subint #2 Shaping Queue1

Subint #2 Shaping Queue2

Dual FIFO Interface Queues

Unfragmented Frames; PQ-Like Service

1

TX Ring

Fragmented Frames

t

AR 128 kbps

64 kbps

Table 5-37 summaries the key points for comparison between the various traffic-shaping tools.

Table 5-37 Comparison of Traffic Shaping Tools: GTS, CB Shaping, DTS, and FRTS

Table 5-37 summaries the key points for comparison between the various traffic-shaping tools.

Table 5-37 Comparison of Traffic Shaping Tools: GTS, CB Shaping, DTS, and FRTS

Feature

GTS

CB Shaping

DTS

FRTS

Supports ATM, FR, HDLC, PPP, LAN interfaces

Yes

Yes

Yes

No

Can be enabled on interfaces and subinterfaces

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Can be enabled per Frame Relay DLCI to support per-VC shaping on multipoint interfaces

No

No

No

Yes

Supports adaptive shaping

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Supports concurrent FRF. 12 Frame Relay fragmentation

No

No

No

Yes

Queuing methods in shaping queue

CBWFQ,

CBWFQ,

LLQ

FIFO, WFQ, CBWFQ, LLQ, PQ, CQ

Concurrent queuing methods on Physical interface

All

All

All

FIFO, FRF*

Table 5-37 Comparison of Traffic Shaping Tools: GTS, CB Shaping, DTS, and FRTS (Continued)

Feature

GTS

CB Shaping

DTS

FRTS

Can be configured using MQC commands

No

Yes

Yes

No

Can classify traffic to shape a subset of the traffic on an interface/VC

Yes

Yes

Yes

No

Default Tc

Variable

125 ms

125 ms

125 ms

Distributes shaping processing to VIPs in 7500 series routers

No

No

Yes

No

* The Cisco QoS course claims WFQ is supported on the physical interface. In addition, FRF is not technically a queuing tool, although its feature of using two queues does achieve the same effect.

Table 5-38 lists the matchable fields for classification for CB policing and CAR.

Table 5-38 Classification Fields Used by CAR and CB Policing

Table 5-38 lists the matchable fields for classification for CB policing and CAR.

Table 5-38 Classification Fields Used by CAR and CB Policing

Field

Tool

Comments

Anything matched with an IP ACL

CAR, CB policing

N/A

Source MAC Address

CAR, CB policing

CAR uses a special access-rate ACL; CB marking uses the match command.

IP Precedence

CAR, CB policing

CAR uses a special access-rate ACL specific to CAR; CB marking uses the match command; Both can match a subset of values.

MPLS Experimental

CAR, CB policing

CAR uses a special access-rate ACL specific to CAR; CB marking uses the match command. Both can match a subset of values.

IP DSCP

CAR, CB policing

Can check for multiple values using multiple match commands.

QoS Group

CAR, CB policing

The QoS Group field is used to tag packets internal to a single router.

Class of Service (CoS)

CB policing

Checks incoming ISL/802.1P CoS bits. Can match multiple values.

Destination MAC Address

CB policing

N/A

Input interface

CB policing

N/A

Table 5-38 Classification Fields Used by CAR and CB Policing (Continued)

Field

Tool

Comments

RTP's UDP port-number range

CB policing

RTP uses even numbered UDP ports from 16384-32767 for voice payload. This matching option allows matching a subset of the port numbers, and it matches only the even-numbered ports.

NBAR protocol types

CB policing

Refer to the coverage in Chapter 3 for more details.

NBAR Citrix applications

CB policing

NBAR can recognize different types of Citrix applications; CB marking can use NBAR to classify based on these application types.

Host Name and URL string

CB policing

NBAR can match URL strings using regular expressions, including the host name. CB marking can use NBAR to match these strings for classification.

Table 5-39 lists the various actions associated with CB policing and CAR.

Table 5-39 Policing Actions Used by CAR and CB Policing

Table 5-39 lists the various actions associated with CB policing and CAR.

Table 5-39 Policing Actions Used by CAR and CB Policing

Action Keyword

Meaning

CAR?

Policer?

drop

Discards the packet

Yes

Yes

transmit

Forwards the packet

Yes

Yes

set-prec-transmit

Forwards the packet after marking the IP precedence value.

Yes

Yes

set-qos-transmit

Forwards the packet after marking the QoS group

Yes

Yes

set-dscp-transmit

Forwards the packet after marking the IP DSCP value

Yes

Yes

set-mpls-exp-transmit

Forwards the packet after marking the MPLS Experimental bits

Yes

Yes

set-frde-transmit

Forwards the packet after marking the Frame Relay discard eligibility (DE) bit

No

Yes

set-clp-transmit

Forwards the packet after marking the ATM cell loss priority (CLP) bit

No

Yes

set-prec-continue

Marks the IP precedence value, and continues to the next nested (cascaded) CAR command

Yes

No

set-dscp-continue

Marks the QoS group, and continues to the next nested (cascaded) CAR command

Yes

No

Table 5-39 Policing Actions Used by CAR and CB Policing (Continued)

Action Keyword

Meaning

CAR?

Policer?

set-mpls-exp-continue

Marks the IP precedence value, and continues to the next nested (cascaded) CAR command

Yes

No

set-qos-continue

Marks the QoS group, and continues to the next nested (cascaded) CAR command

Yes

No

continue

Just continues to the next nested (cascaded) CAR command

Yes

No

Tables 5-40 and 5-41 list the CB policing configuration and show commands, respectively.

Table 5-40 Command Reference for Class-Based Policing

Command

Mode and Function

police bps burst-normal burst-max conform-action action exceed-action action [violate-action action]

Policy-map class subcommand; enables policing for the class, setting the police rate, Bc, and Bc + Be values, and actions taken. Actions are drop, set-clp-transmit, set-dscp-transmit, set-prec-transmit, set-qos-transmit, transmit.

service-policy {input | output} policy-map-name

Interface or subinterface configuration mode; enables CB shaping on the interface.

class-map class-map-name

Global config; names a class map, where classification options are configured.

Match ...

Class-map subcommand; defines specific classification parameters.

match access-group {access-group | name access-group-name}

Access-control list (ACL).

match source-address mac address-destination

Source MAC address.

match ip precedence ip-precedence-value [ip-precedence-value ip-precedence-value ip-precedence-value]

IP precedence.

match mpls experimental number

MPLS Experimental.

match cos cos-value [cos-value cos-value cos-value]

CoS.

match destination-address mac address

Destination MAC address.

match input-interface interface-name

Input interface.

Table 5-40 Command Reference for Class-Based Policing (Continued)

Command

Mode and Function

match ip dscp ip-dscp-value [ip-dscp-value ip-dscp-value ip-dscp-value ip-dscp-value ip-dscp-value ip-dscp-value ip-dscp-value]

IP DSCP.

match ip rtp starting-port-number portrange

RTP's UDP port-number range.

match qos-group qos-group-value

QoS group.

match protocol protocol-name

NBAR protocol types.

match protocol citrix [app application-name-string].

NBAR Citrix applications.

match protocol http [url url-string | host hostname-string | mime MIME-type]

Host name and URL string.

match any

All packets.

policy-map policy-map-name

Global config; names a policy, which is a set of actions to perform.

class name

policy-map subcommand; identifies which packets on which to perform some action by referring to the classification logic in a class map.

Table 5-41 Exec Command Reference for Class-Based Policing

Command

Function

show policy-map policy-map-name

Lists configuration information about all MQC-based QoS tools

show policy-map interface-spec [input | output] [class class-name]

Lists statistical information about the behavior of all MQC-based QoS tools

Tables 5-42 and 5-43 list the CAR configuration and show commands, respectively.

Table 5-42 Configuration Command Reference for CAR

Command

Mode and Function

rate-limit {input | output} [access-group [rate-limit] acl-index] bps burst-normal burst-max conform-action conform-action exceed-action exceed-action

Interface mode; configures classification, marking, policing, and enables CAR on the interface

access-list rate-limit acl-index {precedence | mac-address | exp mask mask}

Global mode; creates a CAR ACL, which can match IP precedence, MAC addresses, and MPLS Experimental bits

The remaining entries describe the possible actions in the rate-limit command:

continue

Evaluates the next rate-limit command

drop

Drops the packet

set-dscp-continue

Sets the differentiated services code point (DSCP) (0 to 63) and evaluates the next rate-limit command.

set-dscp-transmit

Sends the DSCP and transmits the packet

set-mpls-exp-continue

Sets the MPLS Experimental bits (0 to 7) and evaluates the next rate-limit command

set-mpls-exp-transmit

Sets the MPLS Experimental bits (0 to 7) and sends the packet

set-prec-continue

Sets the IP precedence (0 to 7) and evaluates the next rate-limit command

set-prec-transmit

Sets the IP precedence (0 to 7) and sends the packet.

set-qos-continue

Sets the QoS group ID (1 to 99) and evaluates the next rate-limit command

set-qos-transmit

Sets the QoS group ID (1 to 99) and sends the packet

transmit

Sends the packet

Table 5-43 Exec Command Reference for CAR

Command

Function

show interfaces [interface-type interface-number] rate-limit

Displays CAR statistics on the interface specified, or on all interfaces if the interface is not specified

show access-lists rate-limit [acl-index]

Lists information about the configuration of rate-limit ACLs

Table 5-44 summarizes the CAR features, comparing them with CB policing.

Table 5-44 CAR and CB Policing Features Compared

Table 5-44 summarizes the CAR features, comparing them with CB policing.

Table 5-44 CAR and CB Policing Features Compared

Feature

CB Policing

CAR

Allows conform and exceed action categories

Yes

Yes

Allows violate action category

Yes

No

Polices either all traffic, or a subset through classification

Yes

Yes

Uses MQC for configuration

Yes

No

Allows nested or cascaded policing logic

No

Yes

Can be enabled per subinterface

Yes

Yes

Can be enabled per DLCI on multipoint subinterfaces

No

No

Can set ATM CLP bit

Yes

No

Can set FR DE bit

Yes

No

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