Scenario One Answers

1. The hospital needs to provide access to patient records, prescriptions, and information from patient rooms.

2. No cost restrictions were discussed.

3. The technical requirements are as follows: WLAN access from rooms on floors 6 through 10 Redundant access to servers in the data center Fast switching between LAN segments

4. The technical constraint is as follows:

Servers must be located in the first floor data-center rooms.

5. Figure 17-1 shows the logical diagram of the current network.

Figure 17-1 Pearland Hospital Current Network

Figure 17-1 Pearland Hospital Current Network

6. The hospital does not use IP addresses effectively. It uses Class C networks on each floor. Each floor wastes more than 200 IP addresses, because each Class C network provides up to 254 IP addresses.

7. Recommend using a high-speed Layer 3 switch for the building LANs. They can use the router for Internet and WAN access.

8. The primary recommendation is to use private addresses for the network. Using private addresses has been a best-practice policy for private internal networks since 1996. With private addresses, the hospital could release eight of the Class C networks to the ISP, retaining two for ISP connectivity.

With private addresses, the hospital can choose to use 172.16.0.0/16 for private addressing. The addressing scheme shown in Table 17-2 provides sufficient address space for each network.

Table 17-2 IP Addressing Scheme Using Private Addresses

Floor

Servers

Clients

IP Network

1

15

0

172.16.0.0/24

1

0

40

172.16.1.0/24

2

0

43

172.16.2.0/24

3

0

39

172.16.3.0/24

4

0

42

172.16.4.0/24

5

0

17

172.16.5.0/24

6

0

15

172.16.6.0/24

7

0

14

172.16.7.0/24

8

0

20

172.16.8.0/24

9

0

18

172.16.9.0/24

10

0

15

172.16.10.0/24

WLAN: 6, 7, 8, 9, 10

0

40

172.16.20.0/24

Another solution is to retain the public addresses and use them in the internal network. This solution is less preferred than private addressing. Table 17-3 shows the recommended address scheme that would reduce the number of Class C networks.

Table 17-3 IP Addressing Scheme Using Public Address Space

Floor

Servers

Clients

IP Network

1

0

40

200.100.1.0/26

1

15

200.100.1.64/26

2

0

43

200.100.1.128/26

3

0

39

200.100.1.192/26

4

0

42

200.100.2.0/26

5

0

17

200.100.2.64/26

6

0

15

200.100.2.128/26

7

0

14

200.100.2.192/26

8

0

20

200.100.3.0/26

9

0

18

200.100.3.64/26

10

0

15

200.100.3.128/26

WLAN: 6, 7, 8, 9, 10

0

40

200.100.3.192/26

Each subnet has 62 IP addresses for host addressing. Based on the preceding IP addressing scheme, Pearland Hospital does not need networks 200.100.4.0/24 through 200.100.10.0/24.

9. Recommend routing protocols that support variable-length subnet masks (VLSM). The network is small. Recommend RIPv2 or Enhanced Interior Gateway Routing Protocol (EIGRP). Do not recommend Open Shortest Path First (OSPF) because of its configuration complexity.

10. Recommend using two access points on each floor for redundancy. Use a VLAN that spans floors 6 through 10. Change the router to a high-speed Layer 3 switch. Use the router for Internet or WAN access.

11. Figure 17-2 shows the diagram. The router is replaced by the L3 switch to provide high-speed switching between LANs. Each floor has an IP subnet plus a subnet for the WLAN and another for the data center. Each floor has two access points for redundancy. Servers can connect using Fast EtherChannel or Gigabit Ethernet.

Figure 17-2 Pearland Hospital Proposed Network Solution

Figure 17-2 Pearland Hospital Proposed Network Solution

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